Welcome to Inpituca City


WELCOME TO INTIPUCATY CITY is supported by :
_We Women grant by Women Photograph and Photoville ( 2019)
_Moving walls fellowship by Open Society Foundations (2018)
_IADELANTE grant and fellowship by International Women Media Foundation (2017/2018)
_LFI Leica Fotografia International ( 2017)
New York Times 2019
Revista La Diaria 2018
Check the project’s website

[EN]

EL SALVADOR AN USA
2017-2019
Intipuca is without being. It goes and comes back. Intipucá is a cradle, that of the heart, that offamilies, that forges identities and pride. Since 1968 and the departure of Silfredo Chávez, (well)known as the first migrant, entire families (or not so many) decided to migrate to the United
States. Leaving became custom, a part of the history and of the life of the town and of the families. The United States became something close although so distant, The (dis) unit family began to draw a transnational territory, the absences of relatives contrast with the omnipresence of American-style mansions, waiting for a possible return. The stone becomes the way to mark the belonging when the body, the daily living can not do it.
Intipucá is a territory in tension, an identity that was sown there in the distance and that sprangup. The intipuqueños of the United States are organized and remember the adored but left land, participate at a distance in their local life with remittances, foundations and contributions to the municipality. Families became puzzles, and the city became a village for the elderly and teenagers.
We decided to deal with the Central American migration and its relationship with the United States, looking at the place left and not at the place of arrival. Intimate and deep stories that talk about migration not only as a massive event but as a sum of stories.
Through photography, drawing and genealogical trees (made by the Intipuqueños), we seek to understand the identity that is disrupted by an economic and social need and the impact of migrating to a town and its inhabitants.
Done with the photographer Koral Carballo, the journalist Jessica Avalos.

Welcome to Intipuca City
At Hugo Salinas and his uncle Alcides Andrade house. The liberty statue has been brought from the US. El Salvador, Intipuca – September 2017
Welcome to Intipuca City
Ludwin Navarrete, 38 years old. His brothers are all in the US, but he never desired to move there. He beleive on his land and on the work in can do here. Here, he is posing in his farm. Family tree hanmade by the protagonist. In red, people’s name who live in the US and in blue, the ones who live in El Salvador. February/March 2019. Intipuca, El Salvador.

Welcome to Intipuca City

Welcome to Intipuca City
Abigail, living in the US with Vitelia, her sister living in Intipuca. Intipuca, 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Abigail, Claudia’s mother. Intipuca, 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
American Dream? We had instead, a salvadorian dream. Don Jacinto. 2019. Intipuca
Welcome to Intipuca City
Manfredo Mejia, restaurant in Virginia.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Lilita’s restaurant in Maryland.
Welcome to Intipuca City
On the left, view from Virginia, the US. On the right, view of an interoir of a house in Intipuca.
Welcome to Intipuca City
The one who left, never comes back.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Mila and her familiy in front of her house in Virginia. US, 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Trinidad Chavez in the courtyard of his childhood house in Intipuca. He lives in the US for many years, and almost all his family is there. He came for the Intipuca Fest with his sons.Family tree hanmade by the protagonist. In red, people’s name who live in the US and in blue, the ones who live in El Salvador. February/March 2019. Intipuca, El Salvador.
Welcome to Intipuca City
View of an american stylish house in Intipuca. Intipuca, El Salvador – September 2017.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Rocibel in Washington. 2019
Welcome to Intipuca City
Rocibel house in DC
Welcome to Intipuca City
Model of Rosibel’house in Intipuca. Maryland, 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Part of the American Dream is to go back to El Salvador. US, 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
View of ABigail and Jacinto’s beach house, Claudia’s fathers. Intipuca, 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
BLANCA NERIS CHAVEZ, 65 years old “I came back to be my own boss,” says Blanca Neris, who worked for a long time in the United States and returned to retire as a beach hotel owner. After 15 years in the United States, Blanca now runs a business providing employment opportunities to local young people.

Welcome to Intipuca City

Welcome to Intipuca City
Miss FUDI USA, from the foundation of Intipuqueños in the US. Intipuca 2020
Welcome to Intipuca City
Tia Maria, a famous Salvadorian Youtuber in the US during a collective picture of the Ambassadors, a group of Intipuqueños in the US who work to help and fund projects in Intipuca. Intipuca, El Salvador – March 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Miss ADI USA, from the US, for the Intipuca Fest. Intipuca, 2019
Welcome to Intipuca City
Pupils from the local schools are waiting for the school bag they will receive from the ambassadors USA-Intipuca. Intipuca, 2020
Welcome to Intipuca City
Pupils from the local schools are waiting for the school bag they will receive from the ambassadors USA-Intipuca. Intipuca, 2020
Welcome to Intipuca City
A group of children during a parade of queens of Intipucá-USA – March, 2020
Welcome to Intipuca City
Miss in Intipuca. 2019.
Welcome to Intipuca City
Ana Nevi, street vendor in the main square of Intipuca during one of the street party in the city, Her brother is in the US and can’t come back because of he is undocumented and she can’t access to a visa.Family tree hanmade by the protagonist. In red, people’s name who live in the US and in blue, the ones who live in El Salvador.Intipuca, El Salvador – March 11, 2019.

Welcome to Intipuca City

Welcome to Intipuca City
View of a poster in the cultural center of Intipuca promoting the city in spanish and english. Intipuca, El Salvador – February 2019.

 

[ES]

EL SALVADOR Y ESTADOS UNIDOS
Intipuca está sin estar. Desde 1968 y la partida de Silfredo Chávez, (re)conocido como el primer migrante, irse a Estados Unidos se volvió costumbre, una parte de la historia y vida del pueblo y de las familias. Estados Unidos se volvió algo cercano y presente aunque geográficamente lejano.
La (des)unidad familiar empezó a dibujar un territorio transnacional, las ausencias de los parientes contrastan con la omnipresencia de mansiones al estilo norteamericano, a la espera de un posible retorno. La piedra se convierte en el  modo de seguir vinculado con la tierra natal cuando el cuerpo no lo puede hacer. Intipucá es un territorio en tensión, una identidad que fue sembrada en un lejano allá. Las familias se transformaron en rompecabezas, y la ciudad  se volvió un pueblo de ancianos y adolescentes.
A través de la fotografía y árboles genealógicos (hechos a mano por los intipuqueños),  buscamos entender la identidad trastocada por una necesidad económica y social de irse, así como el impacto del hecho de migrar en un pueblo y sus habitantes, reconfigurando la noción de vínculos con el territorio y con la familia. El color rojo representa a los familiares establecidos en EEUU y el azul los que hoy siguen estando en Intipucá.

Trabajo realizado con la fotografa mexicana Koral Carballo y la periodista salvadoreña Jessica Avalos.